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Self-so (ziran, 自然)

  • Yueqing WangEmail author
  • Qinggang Bao
  • Guoxing Guan
Chapter
  • 19 Downloads

Abstract

The idea of self-so had always been important for the Daoists. As a philosophical concept, it is different from the contemporary sense of “nature.” It means instead, so of itself, originally so, the nature of what is so originally, and without artificial action. It also contains the sense of necessarily so, what is determined by mandate (命). Sometimes it also refers to being without intention and without purpose. As a philosophical concept, it is first seen in the Daodejing. It was later inherited by the Zhuangzi and was developed by Wang Chong, Wang Bi and Guo Xiang till it reached its acme.

References

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  2. Forke, Alfred. 1907. Lun-Hêng: philosophical essays of Wang Ch‘ung. Translated by Alfred Forke. London: Luzac and Co.Google Scholar
  3. Lynn, Richard J. 1994. The classic of the changes: a new translation of the I Ching as interpreted by Wang Bi. New York: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
  4. Lynn, Richard J. 1999. The classic of the way and virtue: a new translation of the Tao-Te-Ching of Laozi as interpreted by Wang Bi. New York: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Nanjing University Press 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.NanjingChina

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