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An Algorithm Based on Next Shortest Path in Large EON Under Dynamic Traffic Grooming

  • Prasanta MajumdarEmail author
  • Tanmay De
Conference paper
  • 6 Downloads
Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 1119)

Abstract

The elastic light-trail is one of the cutting-edge technologies implemented in Elastic Optical Networks (EON). The elasticity in an elastic light-trail or lightpath is facilitated by orthogonal frequency division multiplexing. However, in general, to serve a traffic demand generated dynamically in a communication network, a source-destination path is determined by Dijsktra’s shortest path algorithm. Afterwards, a various spectrum allocation procedures are applied and corresponding data transportation is executed for a certain time duration. In the field of dynamic traffic grooming under EON, Minimized Multihop Elastic Lightpath–(mMEL) and Multihop Elastic Lightpath–(MEL) are fundamental algorithms toward the fulfillment of traffic grooming objective. In this study, we investigate the aforesaid algorithms deeply and proposed an innovative algorithm-Multihop Next Shortest Elastic Lightpath–(MNSEL) that utilize next shortest path to minimize and maximize hop counts and network throughput simultaneously, respectively. The fundamental concept in our research study is the next shortest path which is determined recursively until the source-destination route setup process is met, when the shortest path fails to setup the route depending upon a few criteria. However, here, a thorough and rigorous measurement of the efficiency obtained under the proposed algorithm has been performed.

Keywords

Elastic light-trail Nest shortest path (NSPDynamic traffic grooming Orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDMElastic optical networks (EON

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Dr. B. C. Roy Engineering CollegeDurgapurIndia
  2. 2.National Institute of TechnologyDurgapurIndia

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