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Challenges in Achieving Inclusive and Sustainable Growth in India

  • U. SankarEmail author
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Abstract

This paper urges the need for shifting from current inclusive growth strategy to sustainable development strategy in India. There are challenges as well as opportunities in making this shift. The challenges are developing the appropriate database required for integrating and balancing the three pillars—economic, social and environmental—of sustainable development and building the institutional capacity for policy reforms. The opportunities are creation of an enabling institutional and policy environment for the successful implementation of sustainable development.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Madras School of EconomicsChennaiIndia

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