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Role of Industries in Resource Efficiency and Circular Economy

  • R. Van BerkelEmail author
  • Z. Fadeeva
Chapter
  • 28 Downloads

Abstract

Resource Efficiency is concerned with decoupling the growth of human well-being and economic development from the increased use of natural resources and aggravated negative environmental impacts. Resource Efficiency is a linchpin for the transition to Circular Economy, which is ultimately concerned with harmonizing and balancing the cyclic use of materials, both natural and man-made, water and energy in the economy with the long-term carrying capacity of the environment. Resource Efficiency and Circular Economy result from changes in production and consumption systems, and the markets and cultural, normative, policy and regulatory frameworks these operate in. There is compelling evidence of business and economy-wide benefits of greater Resource Efficiency and circularity that can be unlocked by enabling businesses and industries to invest in productivity and innovation, with the three-pronged aim of: maximizing substitution of non-renewable resources; improving the efficiency of use of all natural resources; and perpetually recovering value from all wastes.

Keywords

Resource Efficiency Circular Economy Industry Clean technology 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.United Nations Industrial Development OrganizationNew DelhiIndia
  2. 2.Office of the United Nations Resident CoordinatorNew DelhiIndia

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