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Effect of Drought Stress on Crop Production

  • Mohammed Shariq Iqbal
  • Akhilesh Kumar Singh
  • Mohammad Israil AnsariEmail author
Chapter
  • 12 Downloads

Abstract

Drought stress conditions are imposing a foremost restraint to crop production as a result food security is becoming a most apprehension worldwide. The circumstances have intensified because of the extreme and swift variations in worldwide climatic conditions. Drought is certainly one of the utmost imperative stress situation causing vast impression on growth and development of crop, thus affecting its productivity. Drought stress enforces modifications in fundamental morphology, physiology and biochemical aspects in plant. Thus, it is important to recognize these interferences associated with drought stress for improved crop management. Remarkably, this chapter delivers a comprehensive explanation of plant reactions towards drought stresses. Crop growth, development and production are undesirably affected by drought conditions because of physiological interruptions, physical damages and biochemical modifications in plants. Drought stresses have multidimensional impressions and consequently complicated in mechanistic action. An improved knowledge of plant reactions to drought stress has reasonable repercussion for a better crop modification and management. Thus, a holistic approach is required to fully elucidate and understand the effect of drought stress conditions towards plants for better crop production.

Keywords

Drought stress Biochemical Crop production Morphology Physiology 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mohammed Shariq Iqbal
    • 1
  • Akhilesh Kumar Singh
    • 1
  • Mohammad Israil Ansari
    • 2
    Email author
  1. 1.Amity Institute of Biotechnology, Amity University Uttar PradeshLucknowIndia
  2. 2.Department of BotanyUniversity of LucknowLucknowIndia

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