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Optimum Preparation of Candida albicans Cell Wall Extra (CAWE) for the Mouse Model of Kawasaki Disease

  • Yukako YoshikaneEmail author
  • Tamaki Cho
  • Mitsuhisa Koga
  • Seiji Haraoka
  • Atsushi Ogawa
Open Access
Conference paper
  • 486 Downloads

Abstract

Kawasaki disease is the most common acute systemic vasculitis of unknown etiology in children [1] and can cause inflammation of the coronary arteries leading to aneurysms. Candida albicans extract is one of the materials commonly used to induce coronary arteritis in a mouse model of Kawasaki disease [2, 3]. Here we report an optimized method for preparing C. albicans cell wall extra (CAWE).

Keywords

Kawasaki disease Animal model Candida albicans 
Kawasaki disease is the most common acute systemic vasculitis of unknown etiology in children [1] and can cause inflammation of the coronary arteries leading to aneurysms. Candida albicans extract is one of the materials commonly used to induce coronary arteritis in a mouse model of Kawasaki disease [2, 3]. Here we report an optimized method for preparing C. albicans cell wall extra (CAWE).
  1. 1.

    80% of the mice administered CAWE that had been alkalinized at 87 °C showed massive inflammation around the origin of the coronary arteries. By contrast, the mice administered CAWE that had been alkalinized at 97 °C showed no inflammation.

     
  2. 2.

    60% of the mice administered CAWE adjusted to 640 μg protein/mouse died within 2 days whereas 100% of the mice administered CAWE adjusted to 320 μg protein/mouse exhibited inflammation but survived.

     

In conclusion, high heat processing causes poor pathogenicity and high protein content causes excessive pathogenicity. Therefore, CAWE that has been heat processed at 87 °C and adjusted to 320 μg protein/mouse is optimal for the mouse model of Kawasaki disease.

Notes

Acknowledgment

We thank Kate Fox, DPhil, from Edanz Group (www.edanzediting.com/ac) for editing a draft of this manuscript.

References

  1. 1.
    Kawasaki T, Kosaki F, Okawa S, Shigematsu I, Yanagawa H. A new infantile acute febrile mucocutaneous lymph node syndrome (MLNS) prevailing in Japan. Pediatrics. 1974;54:271–6.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Murata H. Experimental candida-induced arteritis in mice. Relation to arteritis in the mucocutaneous lymph node syndrome. Microbiol Immunol. 1979;23:825–31.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Takahashi K, Oharaseki T, Wakayama M, Yokouchi Y, Naoe S, Murata H. Histopathological features of murine systemic vasculitis caused by Candida albicans extract—an animal model of Kawasaki disease. Inflamm Res. 2004;53:72–7.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

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© The Author(s) 2020

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Authors and Affiliations

  • Yukako Yoshikane
    • 1
    Email author
  • Tamaki Cho
    • 2
  • Mitsuhisa Koga
    • 3
  • Seiji Haraoka
    • 4
  • Atsushi Ogawa
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PediatricsFukuoka University, Chikushi HospitalFukuokaJapan
  2. 2.Department of Oral MicrobiologyFukuoka Dental CollegeFukuokaJapan
  3. 3.Faculty of Pharmaceutical SciencesFukuoka UniversityFukuokaJapan
  4. 4.Department of PathologyFukuoka University, Chikushi HospitalFukuokaJapan

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