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Introduction: National Human Rights Institutions in Southeast Asia: Challenges to the Protection of Human Rights

  • James GomezEmail author
  • Robin Ramcharan
Chapter
  • 36 Downloads

Abstract

In this introductory chapter, the authors note the proliferation of National Human Rights Institutions (NHRIs) around the world, including in Southeast Asia. This fact is well reflected in academic literature on NHRIs. This work focuses its analysis specifically on the region’s NHRIs in light of the contemporary context and focuses on their protection capacity, including quasi-judicial functions. They note a collective, normative call by contributors for NHRIs to purposively pursue their existing mandates and to pursue more vigorously quasi-judicial protection mandates.

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Copyright information

© Asia Centre 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Asia CentreBangkokThailand

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