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The 2018-Coastal Problems in Thailand’s Second Largest Coastal City

  • Cherdvong SaengsupavanichEmail author
Conference paper

Abstract

Understanding the dynamics of the problem is a key to successful coastal management. This research explored current coastal problems occurring in Chonburi province, Thailand. Due to its second largest gross provincial products per capita and its 170 km of diverse coastline, the coastal problems occurring in Chonburi province could represent the coastal problems for the whole country. Every seafront local governmental unit in Chonburi province was officially approached and their past annual action plans were collected. Ocean-related projects contained in the action plans were extracted and analyzed to backtrack the types of coastal problems. As the results, seven types of coastal problems were unearthed, being; maritime traffics and accidents, decreased coastal animal abundance, inadequate awareness and knowledge of coastal stakeholders, land-based wastewater discharged into the ocean, marine debris, coastal erosion, and mangrove trespassing and destruction. The results of this research can be shared among other nations across the globe, compared with the coastal problems in western countries, or can serve as data for Asia-Pacific regional comparison studies.

Keywords

Integrated coastal management Coastal survey Chonburi Coastal degradation Coastal governmental unit 

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Notes

Acknowledgements

This research was supported by the author’s personal budget. The author would like to thank his assistants for communicating with SAO officers.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of International Maritime StudiesKasetsart UniversityTungsukla, Sri RachaThailand

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