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The Concepts of Virtual Water and Water Footprint

  • Meng XuEmail author
  • Chunhui Li
Chapter

Abstract

In this chapter, the concepts of virtual water and water footprint were introduced comprehensively. In addition, the studies on both virtual water and water footprint were summarized based on an extensive literature reviews.

Keywords

Virtual water Virtual water trade Water footprint Water footprint accounting 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Public AdministrationZhejiang University of Finance and EconomicsHangzhouChina
  2. 2.School of EnvironmentBeijing Normal UniversityBeijingChina

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