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The Exploration on Interacting Teaching Mode of Augmented Reality Based on HoloLens

  • Cong Liu
  • Xinyi Chen
  • Shuangjian Liu
  • Xin Zhang
  • Shuanglin Ding
  • Yindi Long
  • Dongbo ZhouEmail author
Conference paper
Part of the Communications in Computer and Information Science book series (CCIS, volume 1048)

Abstract

In recent years, the applications of augmented reality and the visualization of mixed reality for education are popular. However the lacking of multi-modal interaction for teaching and learning results in the teaching mode staying at the teacher-centered knowledge-feeding pattern, and the ability of the AR technology underutilized. This paper proposes an interactive teaching mode of augmented reality based on HoloLens, taking full advantage of the device which combines 3D scenes, audio, video and teaching content. Applying gesture, voice, holographic interaction and viewpoint tracking technology to practical teaching, this paper demonstrates a new student-centered teaching mode which includes the dynamic classroom teaching, multi-modal interactive practicing and the multi-form feedback learning. This paper carries out an empirical research in senior one students. The results indicate that the interest and initiative of students in learning are increased, the ability of understanding abstract knowledge is significantly improved, and the academic performance of students is promoted. This paper is devoted to promoting the deep integration of augmented reality and teaching, the innovation in teaching process and method has been explored positively.

Keywords

Augmented reality HoloLens Interactive learning Learning environment Nonlinear interactive teaching mode Mobile learning 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This research is financially supported by the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (No. CCNU19QN35), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 41671377).

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cong Liu
    • 1
  • Xinyi Chen
    • 1
  • Shuangjian Liu
    • 1
  • Xin Zhang
    • 1
  • Shuanglin Ding
    • 1
  • Yindi Long
    • 2
  • Dongbo Zhou
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  1. 1.National Engineering Research Center for E-LearningCentral China Normal UniversityWuhanChina
  2. 2.National Engineering Laboratory for Educational Big DataCentral China Normal UniversityWuhanChina

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