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Study on the Optimization Wall Structure in Hot and Humid Climate Region Based on Analytic Hierarchy Process

  • Xingguo Guo
  • Shiwei He
  • Yue Wu
  • Ying Liu
  • Xiangwei LiuEmail author
Conference paper
  • 241 Downloads
Part of the Environmental Science and Engineering book series (ESE)

Abstract

It is of great significance to consider the problems of mold and mildew growth and condensation when designing walls in hot and humid climate region. In this paper, analytic hierarchy process (AHP) method was used to obtain the optimal wall structure. Taking a typical city in hot and humid climate region, Nanchang, as an example, the advantages and disadvantages of the four typical walls including brick wall, aerated concrete wall, plasterboard–fiberglass–brick wall and new-type wooden structure were ranked using AHP method. The weight coefficients of the four typical walls were 0.0573, 0.4215, 0.1489, and 0.3723, respectively. The results indicate that the aerated concrete wall has the best comprehensive performance among the four kinds of walls in hot and humid climate region.

Keywords

Hygrothermal performance Heat transfer Mold growth risk Economy AHP 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant no. 51708271, 51408294).

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xingguo Guo
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Shiwei He
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Yue Wu
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Ying Liu
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Xiangwei Liu
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    Email author
  1. 1.School of Civil Engineering and ArchitectureNanchang UniversityNanchangChina
  2. 2.Key Laboratory for Ultra-Low Energy Buildings of Jiangxi ProvinceNanchangChina
  3. 3.Engineering Lab for Nearly Zero Energy Buildings of Jiangxi ProvinceNanchangChina

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