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The Effect of Internal Load on the Selection of Heat Radiator

  • Guoyi Xu
  • Yiwen JianEmail author
Conference paper
  • 229 Downloads
Part of the Environmental Science and Engineering book series (ESE)

Abstract

The selection of heat radiator has a non-negligible impact on the heating effect of the building. The rationality of the radiator selection will directly affect the project cost and actual heating effect. Building load calculation is an important part of radiator selection. The goal of this paper is to investigate the effect of internal load on the selection of radiator. Taking the terminal heat radiator in one dormitory room in Beijing as the example, the simulation was performed using DeST-h software based on the actual outdoor meteorological parameters. Room heat loads considering the room’s internal load disturbances and not considering the room’s internal load were calculated separately, by which the radiators were selected, respectively. The designed supply-return water temperature is 75/50 °C. Then DeST-h software was introduced to simulate the heating effect of the room. It was found that the room temperature after heating in consideration of room’s load disturbances can meet the comfort requirements, and the indoor temperature without considering the internal load disturbances in the room may be excessively high. For the rooms located in the north and south directions, the radiator’s area can be saved by 18.9 and 20.3% when considering the room’s internal loads. The significance of this research is that it has an important role in the correct selection of the radiator, which can save the project cost, reduce the heating energy consumption, and provide a comfortable indoor thermal environment.

Keywords

Heating Selection of radiator Internal load disturbances of room 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors would like to thank the Natural Science Foundation of Beijing (3182006) for its financial support of research.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.College of Architecture and Civil EngineeringBeijing University of TechnologyBeijingChina
  2. 2.Green Building Environment and Energy-Saving TechnologyBeijing Key LaboratoryBeijingChina

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