Advertisement

Determination of the Three Key Parameters Estimating Indoor Air Filtration Load Regarding PM2.5 Penetration Through Infiltration

  • Ziguang Chen
  • Chao ChenEmail author
  • Guoqing Cao
  • Zixi Li
  • Yan Wu
  • Guanpeng Cao
  • Yirong Yuan
  • Xuan Li
  • Qinqiang Hu
Conference paper
  • 204 Downloads
Part of the Environmental Science and Engineering book series (ESE)

Abstract

Air filters are one effective way of removing indoor fine particulate matter (generally known as PM2.5). An accurate evaluation of indoor PM2.5 filtration load will provide great help in designing efficient air filtration systems. In order to make the existing indoor PM2.5 filtration load calculation model more available by considering the availability of some important parameters, such as air infiltration volume through a unit length of external window (ql), particle penetration factor (P), and deposition rate (k), this study introduces a determination method of those key design parameters for various external window airtightness levels under infiltration conditions. Furthermore, the indoor PM2.5 filtration loads were quantified based on a longitudinal field measurement from five unoccupied offices located in the central area of Beijing, China. Results revealed that higher airtightness level windows can help to significantly decrease the indoor PM2.5 filtration load. The proposed method in this study can help in the calculation of indoor PM2.5 filtration load through infiltration and the design of indoor air filtration systems.

Keywords

Outdoor PM2.5 pollution Air infiltration Indoor PM2.5 filtration load Field measurement 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was sponsored by the 13th Five-Year Key Project, Ministry of Science and Technology of China (No. 2017YFC0702800).

References

  1. 1.
    Kuo, H.W., Shen, H.Y.: Indoor and outdoor PM2.5 and PM10 concentrations in the air during a dust storm. Build. Environ. 45(3), 610–614 (2010)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Martins, N.R., da Graca, G.C.: Simulation of the effect of fine particle pollution on the potential for natural ventilation of non-domestic buildings in European cities. Build. Environ. 115, 236–250 (2017)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    GB/T 7106-2008: Graduations and Test Methods of Air Permeability, Watertightness, Wind Load Resistance Performance for Building External Windows and Doors. Standardization Administration of the People’s Republic of China (2008)Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Zhao, L., Chen, C., Wang, P., Chen, Z.G., Cao, S.J., Wang, Q.Q., Xie, G.Y., Wan, Y.L., Wang, Y.F., Lu, B.: Influence of atmospheric fine particulate matter (PM2.5) pollution on indoor environment during winter in Beijing. Build. Environ. 87, 283–291 (2015)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Nazaroff, W.W.: Indoor particle dynamics. Indoor Air 14, 175–183 (2004)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Liu, D.L., Nazaroff, W.W.: Modeling pollutant penetration across building envelopes. Atmos. Environ. 35(26), 4451–4462 (2001)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Riley, W.J., McKone, T.E., Lai, A.C.K., Nazaroff, W.W.: Indoor particulate matter of outdoor origin: importance of size-dependent removal mechanisms. Environ. Sci. Technol. 36(2), 200–207 (2002)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Ji, W.J., Zhao, B.: Contribution of outdoor-originating particles, indoor-emitted particles and indoor secondary organic aerosol (SOA) to residential indoor PM2.5 concentration: a model-based estimation. Build. Environ. 90, 196–205 (2015)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Chen, Z.G., Chen, C., Wei, S., Wu, Y.Q., Wang, Y.F., Wan, Y.L.: Impact of the external window crack structure on indoor PM2.5 mass concentration. Build. Environ. 108, 240–251 (2016)CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ziguang Chen
    • 1
  • Chao Chen
    • 2
    Email author
  • Guoqing Cao
    • 1
  • Zixi Li
    • 2
  • Yan Wu
    • 3
  • Guanpeng Cao
    • 1
  • Yirong Yuan
    • 1
  • Xuan Li
    • 1
  • Qinqiang Hu
    • 4
  1. 1.Institute of Building Environment and Energy EfficiencyChina Academy of Building ResearchBeijingChina
  2. 2.College of Architecture and Civil EngineeringBeijing University of TechnologyBeijingChina
  3. 3.CAUPD Beijing Planning & Design Consultants CoBeijingChina
  4. 4.Beijing General Municipal Engineering Design & Research Institute Co., Ltd.BeijingChina

Personalised recommendations