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Enhancing Professional Knowledge and Professional Artistry of Art and Music Teachers Through Teacher Inquiry

  • Siew Ling ChuaEmail author
  • Ai Wee Seow
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter discusses how teacher inquiry projects that have been facilitated by Singapore Teachers’ Academy for the aRts (STAR) could enhance professional knowledge and professional artistry of teachers. It posits that a range of research practices for different purposes should be explored to provide critical perspectives for professional learning and reflective practice. A systemic review of 60 articles written by art and music teachers in primary and secondary schools from 2013 to 2018 was conducted to find out the kinds of research conducted by teachers, and how they contribute to enhance their professional knowledge and professional artistry. The study found that there was a greater interest in pedagogical approaches and student learning experiences compared to musical processes, student motivation, student outcomes and professional development. There was also a preference for qualitative and mixed methods, and the review found perspectival and pedagogical changes in art and music teachers’ professional knowledge and professional artistry. The chapter argues for the need for a diversity of methodologies and research to enhance the professional development of art and music teachers that respect various research paradigms in re-examining one’s own pedagogical content knowledge and one’s professional artistry, as there are multiplicities of art and music teaching practices, and teacher identities. The growth of professional knowledge and professional artistry will be enriched by such diverse inquiry processes that draw on the unique experiences and orientations of individuals.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Singapore Teachers’ Academy for the aRtsSingaporeSingapore

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