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Quantitative Performance Monitoring of China’s HIV Response

  • Yufen LiuEmail author
  • Scottie Bussell
  • Guodong Mi
Chapter

Abstract

China has made tremendous progress in advancing its national HIV program. Key to this progress was setting targets to motivate implementers to work effectively. Indicators were established using an iterative process with national stakeholders while also meeting international pressures. A plethora of demands may have distracted from ownership of the initial national program but, in the end, strengthened a focus on marginalized groups. China gradually relied less on donors and developed a uniquely Chinese HIV control program. The result was remarkable enlargement of prevention and treatment services that led to a reduction in mortality. Setting targets, and measuring performance against those targets, was vital to gauge continued progress and identify gaps in programing and implementation.

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors would like to thank Jennifer M. McGoogan for her input and editorial assistance.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.NCAIDSChina CDCBeijingChina

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