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Principles of Structural Safety Studies

  • Jeom Kee PaikEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Topics in Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality book series (TSRQ, volume 37)

Abstract

This chapter addresses principles of advanced structural safety studies in association with various types of extreme and accidental events. The structural consequences of extreme conditions and accidents are inevitably volatile, uncertain, complex, and ambiguous (VUCA). Methods to model random parameters affecting such extreme conditions and accidents are presented. The importance of limit states- and risk-based approaches is emphasized to manage VUCA environments. Future trends toward advanced structural safety studies are addressed.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Mechanical EngineeringUniversity College LondonLondonUK
  2. 2.The Korea Ship and Offshore Research Institute (Lloyd’s Register Foundation Research Centre of Excellence)Pusan National UniversityBusanKorea (Republic of)

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