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Community Forest Board Game for Learning Interactions Among Ecosystem Components in Community Forest with Local People

  • Sutanan Pinmaneenopparat
  • Kulchadarat Punyawong
  • Itsarawan Huaihongthong
  • Nuttakul Khunnala
  • Patcharapon Jumsri
  • Sucharat Tungsukruthai
  • Wuthiwong Wimolsakcharoen
  • Pongchai Dumrongrojwatthana
Chapter
Part of the Translational Systems Sciences book series (TSS, volume 18)

Abstract

A “community forest” board game was created and used with local villagers and teachers for collective learning about the community’s forest ecosystem components and services. The game was composed of a gameboard and set of photo cards. In the field workshop, two or three representatives from seven villages and two teachers from Lainan Subdistrict, Nan Province, Northern Thailand, were invited to participate in the gaming session. After playing, a debriefing session was conducted, and players were asked to share their ideas about conserving their community forest. The results showed that players could discuss and match the photo cards and the clues on the gameboard. They also shared their own knowledge about the diversity of organisms, especially mushrooms, plants, and animals, and how to use them. Moreover, improvements and future use of this game were discussed between the players and authors.

Keywords

Interactions Gaming and simulation Non-timber forest products Northern Thailand 

Notes

Acknowledgement

The authors would like to thank the Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, and the Plant Genetic Conservation Project under the Royal Initiative of Her Royal Highness Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn for financial support.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sutanan Pinmaneenopparat
    • 1
  • Kulchadarat Punyawong
    • 1
  • Itsarawan Huaihongthong
    • 1
  • Nuttakul Khunnala
    • 1
  • Patcharapon Jumsri
    • 1
  • Sucharat Tungsukruthai
    • 1
  • Wuthiwong Wimolsakcharoen
    • 2
  • Pongchai Dumrongrojwatthana
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biology, Faculty of ScienceChulalongkorn UniversityBangkokThailand
  2. 2.Biological Sciences Program, Faculty of ScienceChulalongkorn UniversityBangkokThailand

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