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Taurine 11 pp 597-610 | Cite as

An Aqueous Extract of Octopus ocellatus Meat Protects Hepatocytes Against H2O2-Induced Oxidative Stress via the Regulation of Bcl-2/Bax Signaling

  • WonWoo Lee
  • Eui Jeong Han
  • Su-Jin Oh
  • Eun-Ji Shin
  • Hee-Jin Han
  • Kyungsook Jung
  • Soo-Jin Heo
  • Eun-A Kim
  • Kil-Nam Kim
  • Ihn-Sil Kwak
  • Min Ju Kim
  • Ginnae AhnEmail author
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 1155)

Abstract

Octopus ocellatus meat (OM) is well known as a plentiful protein source. In this study, we evaluated the hepatoprotective effect of an aqueous extract of OM (OMA) against H2O2-triggered oxidative stress in human hepatocytes. First of all, taurine rich OMA showed a good ORAC value and reducing power and it was similar with that of ascorbic acid, which is known as a strong antioxidant. Also, OMA significantly improved H2O2-decreased cell viability by reducing the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in hepatocytes. Interestingly, the stimulation of H2O2-induced the formations of apoptotic bodies and sub-G1 DNA content, whereas they were inhibited by the treatment with OMA. Furthermore, OMA regulated the protein expression levels of apoptotic molecules, such as Bax and Bcl-2. Taken together, this study suggests that OMA, which contains an abundant amount of taurine, protects hepatocytes from H2O2-triggered oxidative stress and might be a functional food material with hepatoprotective effects.

Keywords

Taurine Octopus ocellatus meat Aqueous extract Protective effect 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education (2018R1A6A1A03024314).

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • WonWoo Lee
    • 1
  • Eui Jeong Han
    • 2
  • Su-Jin Oh
    • 3
  • Eun-Ji Shin
    • 2
  • Hee-Jin Han
    • 2
  • Kyungsook Jung
    • 4
  • Soo-Jin Heo
    • 5
  • Eun-A Kim
    • 5
  • Kil-Nam Kim
    • 6
  • Ihn-Sil Kwak
    • 7
  • Min Ju Kim
    • 2
  • Ginnae Ahn
    • 2
    • 3
    Email author
  1. 1.Freshwater Biosources Utilization Bureau, Bioresources Industrialization Support DivisionNakdonggang National Institute of Biological Resources (NNIBR)SangjuRepublic of Korea
  2. 2.Department of Food Technology and NutritionChonnam National UniversityYeosuRepublic of Korea
  3. 3.Department of Marine Bio-Food SciencesChonnam National UniversityYeosuRepublic of Korea
  4. 4.Natural Product Material Research CenterKorea Research Institute of Bioscience and BiotechnologyJeongeup-siRepublic of Korea
  5. 5.Jeju International Marine Science Center for Research & EducationKorea Institute of Ocean Science & Technology (KIOST)JejuRepublic of Korea
  6. 6.Chuncheon CenterKorea Basic Science Institute (KBSI)ChuncheonRepublic of Korea
  7. 7.Faculty of Marine TechnologyChonnam National UniversityYeosuRepublic of Korea

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