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Taurine 11 pp 583-596 | Cite as

An Aqueous Extract from Batillus Cornutus Meat Protects Against H2O2-Mediated Cellular Damage via Up-Regulation of Nrf2/HO-1 Signal Pathway in Chang Cells

  • WonWoo Lee
  • Hee-Jin Han
  • Eui Jeong Han
  • Eun-Ji Shin
  • Kyungsook Jung
  • Soo-Jin Heo
  • Ihn-Sil Kwak
  • Sang-Cheol Kim
  • Min-Jeong Seo
  • Min Ju Kim
  • Eun-A Kim
  • Seon-Heui Cha
  • Ginnae AhnEmail author
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 1155)

Abstract

In this study, we evaluated the protective effects of an aqueous extract from Batillus cornutus meat (BM) against cellular oxidative damage caused by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in human hepatocyte, Chang cells. First, we prepared an aqueous extract of BM meat (BMW) showing the highest taurine content among free amino acid contents. BMW led to high antioxidant activity showing 2,2-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline)-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) radical scavenging activity, good reducing power and an oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) value. Also, BMW improved cell viability that was diminished by H2O2 exposure, as it reduced the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in Chang cells. In addition, BMW up-regulated the production of antioxidant enzymes, such as catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD), compared to H2O2-treated Chang cells lacking BMW. Moreover, BMW induced the expressions of nuclear Nrf2 and cytosolic HO-1 in H2O2-treated Chang cells. Interestingly, the treatment of ZnPP, HO-1 inhibitor, abolished the improvement in cell viability and intracellular ROS generation mediated by BMW treatment. In conclusion, this study suggests that BMW protects hepatocytes against H2O2-mediated cellular oxidative damage via up-regulation of the Nrf2/HO-1 signal pathway.

Keywords

Batillus cornutus meat Taurine Antioxidant effect Cellular oxidative stress Protective effect Nrf2/HO-1 signal pathway 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education (2018R1A6A1A03024314).

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • WonWoo Lee
    • 1
  • Hee-Jin Han
    • 2
  • Eui Jeong Han
    • 2
  • Eun-Ji Shin
    • 2
  • Kyungsook Jung
    • 3
  • Soo-Jin Heo
    • 4
  • Ihn-Sil Kwak
    • 5
  • Sang-Cheol Kim
    • 1
  • Min-Jeong Seo
    • 1
  • Min Ju Kim
    • 2
  • Eun-A Kim
    • 4
  • Seon-Heui Cha
    • 6
  • Ginnae Ahn
    • 2
    • 7
    Email author
  1. 1.Freshwater Biosources Utilization Bureau, Bioresources Industrialization Support DivisionNakdonggang National Institute of Biological Resources (NNIBR)SangjuRepublic of Korea
  2. 2.Department of Food Technology and NutritionChonnam National UniversityYeosuRepublic of Korea
  3. 3.Immunoregulatory Materials Research CenterKorea Research Institute of Bioscience and BiotechnologyJeonbukRepublic of Korea
  4. 4.Jeju International Marine Science Center for Research & EducationKorea Institute of Ocean Science & Technology (KIOST)JejuRepublic of Korea
  5. 5.Faculty of Marine TechnologyChonnam National UniversityYeosuRepublic of Korea
  6. 6.Department of Marine BioindustryHanseo UniversitySeosanRepublic of Korea
  7. 7.Department of Marine Bio-Food SciencesChonnam National UniversityYeosuRepublic of Korea

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