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Taurine 11 pp 567-581 | Cite as

A Hepatoprotective Effect of a Hot Water Extract from Loliolus beka Gray Meat Against H2O2-Induced Oxidative Damage in Hepatocytes

  • Eui Jeong Han
  • Eun-Ji Shin
  • Hee-Jin Han
  • WonWoo Lee
  • Kyungsook Jung
  • Soo-Jin Heo
  • Eun-A Kim
  • Kil-Nam Kim
  • Min-Ju Kim
  • Seon-Heui Cha
  • Ginnae AhnEmail author
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 1155)

Abstract

Here, we investigated the hepatoprotective effect of a hot water extract from Loliolus beka gray meat (LBMH) containing plentiful taurine in H2O2-induced oxidative stress in hepatocytes. LBMH potently scavenged the 2,2-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline)-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals and exhibited the good reducing power and the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) value. Also, LBMH improved the cell viability against H2O2-induced hepatic damage in cultured hepatocytes by reducing intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. In addition, LBMH inhibited apoptosis via a reduction in sub-G1 cell population, as well as inhibition of apoptotic body formation from H2O2-induced oxidative damage in hepatocytes. Moreover, LBMH regulated the expression levels of Bax, a pro-apoptotic molecule and Bcl-2, an anti-apoptotic molecule in H2O2-treated hepatocytes. Additionally, pre-treatment with LBMH increased the expression of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1), which is a hepatoprotective enzyme, by activating the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) in H2O2-treated hepatocytes. Taken together, LBMH may be useful as a food ingredient for treatment of liver disease by regulating the Nrf2/HO-1 signal pathway.

Keywords

Loliolus beka gray meat Nrf2/HO-1 signal pathway Antioxidant activity ROS Apoptosis 

Notes

Acknowledgement

This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Kore(NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education (2018016523).

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eui Jeong Han
    • 1
  • Eun-Ji Shin
    • 1
  • Hee-Jin Han
    • 1
  • WonWoo Lee
    • 2
  • Kyungsook Jung
    • 3
  • Soo-Jin Heo
    • 4
  • Eun-A Kim
    • 4
  • Kil-Nam Kim
    • 5
  • Min-Ju Kim
    • 1
  • Seon-Heui Cha
    • 6
  • Ginnae Ahn
    • 1
    • 7
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Food Technology and NutritionChonnam National UniversityYeosuRepublic of Korea
  2. 2.Freshwater Biosources Utilization Bureau, Bioresources Industrialization Support DivisionNakdonggang National Institute of Biological Resources (NNIBR)SangjuRepublic of Korea
  3. 3.Natural Product Material Research CenterKorea Research Institute of Bioscience and BiotechnologyJeongeup-siRepublic of Korea
  4. 4.Jeju International Marine Science Center for Research & EducationKorea Institute of Ocean Science & Technology (KIOST)JejuRepublic of Korea
  5. 5.Chuncheon CenterKorea Basic Science Institute (KBSI)ChuncheonRepublic of Korea
  6. 6.Department of Marine BioindustryHanseo UniversitySeosanRepublic of Korea
  7. 7.Department of Marine Bio-Food SciencesChonnam National UniversityYeosuRepublic of Korea

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