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Anterior Segment Surgery Instruments

  • Sahil Thakur
  • Natasha Gautam Seth
  • Monika Balyan
  • Parul Ichhpujani
Chapter
Part of the Current Practices in Ophthalmology book series (CUPROP)

Abstract

Surgical instruments are the proverbial “workhorse” of the ophthalmic surgeons. The instruments described in this chapter are some of the most commonly encountered by those dealing with ocular surgery. Although not always recognized, a proper understanding of surgical instruments plays a vital role in good surgical patient outcomes. Incorrect handling and use of surgical instruments can reduce precision and increase fatigue. Recent literature shows that surgeons performing minimally invasive surgery (MIS) when compared with surgeons performing open surgery were significantly more likely to experience pain in the neck, arm, shoulder, hands, and legs and experience higher odds of fatigue and numbness [1]. Factors like instrument ergonomics, surgeon posture, and surgery duration have been correlated to these symptoms. It is unfortunate that 59–99% of surgeons are unaware of the ergonomic recommendations of their institutions and usually none receive mandatory ergonomic training [1, 2].

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sahil Thakur
    • 1
  • Natasha Gautam Seth
    • 2
  • Monika Balyan
    • 3
  • Parul Ichhpujani
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Ocular EpidemiologySingapore Eye Research InstituteSingapore
  2. 2.Glaucoma Services, Department of Ophthalmology, Advanced Eye CentrePost Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER)ChandigarhIndia
  3. 3.Cataract and Refractive Services, Department of Ophthalmology, Advanced Eye CentrePost Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER)ChandigarhIndia
  4. 4.Glaucoma ServicesGovernment Medical College and HospitalChandigarhIndia

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