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Threats and Conservation

  • S. Noorunnisa BegumEmail author
  • K. Ravi Kumar
  • B. N. Divakara
Chapter

Abstract

Red sanders (Pterocarpus santalinus) is restricted in its distribution to Southern Eastern Ghats of India and listed by IUCN as endangered species. P. santalinus is the only species of Pterocarpus that has been listed in Appendix II of CITES. Major threats for this endangered tree are illegal and unsustainable harvesting, forest fire, grazing, loss of habitat, inbreeding, pests, diseases, low fruit set and poor regeneration. The threats and methods for conservation of this precious tree are reviewed and discussed.

Keywords

Pterocarpus santalinus Threats Conservation 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Noorunnisa Begum
    • 1
    Email author
  • K. Ravi Kumar
    • 1
  • B. N. Divakara
    • 2
  1. 1.Centre of Repository of Medicinal Resources, School of Conservation of Natural ResourcesFoundation for Revitalization of Local Health TraditionsBangaloreIndia
  2. 2.Institute of Wood Science and Technology, ICFREBangaloreIndia

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