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Civic Engagement of Students and Academics in Political Events

  • Wing-Wah LawEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Governance and Citizenship in Asia book series (GOCIA)

Abstract

This chapter first examines how the changing domestic political context has confronted Hong Kong higher education institutions and their governance, particularly during HKSARCE C. Y. Leung’s tenure. Specifically, it focuses on two definitive political events in post-1997 Hong Kong—the 2012 anti-national movement and the 2014 Occupy Central—that revealed significant differences between the political ideology of many Hong Kong people and the central and Hong Kong governments, regarding the “one country, two systems” framework, and involved students’ and academics’ civic engagement in political movements as a means of negotiation, to test the authorities’ bottom lines, and to curb government initiatives they deemed unacceptable. However, the two events fostered greater distrust between the central government and Hong Kong people, and further revealed that governments ultimately determined what type and extent of civic engagement was acceptable and would be tolerated.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of EducationUniversity of Hong KongHong KongChina

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