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The World of the Female Miner in Japan: Sites of Compliance and Resistance

  • Tai Wei Lim
  • Naoko Shimazaki
  • Yoshihisa Godo
  • Yiru Lim
Chapter

Abstract

The aim of this chapter is to utilize a gendered lens to understand the socio-cultural and historical contexts and working conditions under which Japanese women miners laboured, and, consequently, to analyse points of resistance, if any, that women displayed within this environment. By concentrating on social history and community relations and dynamics, gender relations can be better understood within their relevant contexts. The increasing acceptance of gender analyses is part of a greater change in the presentation and understanding of history, which places emphasis on the advancement of counter-narratives that showcase aspects of history that depart from or add to existing official records maintained by the state or large corporations.

Keywords

Gender Compliance Resistance Female 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tai Wei Lim
    • 1
  • Naoko Shimazaki
    • 2
  • Yoshihisa Godo
    • 3
  • Yiru Lim
    • 1
  1. 1.Singapore University of Social SciencesSingaporeSingapore
  2. 2.Waseda UniversityTokyoJapan
  3. 3.Meiji Gakuin UniversityTokyoJapan

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