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Introduction: Positioning School Readiness and Early Childhood Education in the Indian Context

  • Venita Kaul
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter provides a theoretical, conceptual, and contextual introduction to the book. It is divided into two parts, with the first part focusing on helping the readers develop a technical understanding of the meaning, scope, and significance of the concepts of early childhood education and school readiness and their interrelationships. This discussion rests in the context of the current “learning crisis” that is looming large over school education across the Global South. The second part places the discussion specifically in the Indian context, with the aim of familiarizing readers with the broader landscape of policies and provisions in early childhood education and school readiness in the country; it also gives a glimpse of the challenges that still remain.

Keywords

Early years Early childhood School readiness Learning levels Early childhood in India 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Venita Kaul
    • 1
  1. 1.CECEDAmbedkar University DelhiNew DelhiIndia

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