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An Internationally Comparative Framework for Analysing Employment Relations and the Gig Economy

  • Chris F. Wright
  • Greg J. Bamber
  • Nick Wailes
  • Russell D. Lansbury
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter starts to develop a novel multi-scalar analytical framework for comparing employment relations internationally, which includes the influence of the institutional dynamics of industrial sectors and global production networks as well as national systems. It also discusses three aspects of the gig economy. Further, it proposes a research agenda that would look beyond Varieties of Capitalism approaches, to embrace a more dynamic and diverse array of regulatory systems, including the gig economy and other developments in the world of work and employment relations.

Keywords

Gig economy, global production networks International and comparative employment relations Liberal market economies Coordinated market economies Multi-level analysis Varieties of capitalism 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This chapter builds on the book International and Comparative Employment Relations: National Regulation, Global Changes (Bamber, Lansbury, Wailes and Wright, 6th edition, 2016). Many thanks to all those who helped to improve the book, including the contributors (William Brown, Foreword; Jeremy Waddington, UK; Harry C. Katz and Alexander J.S. Colvin, USA; Daphne G. Taras and Scott Walsworth, Canada; Lucio Baccaro and Valeria Pulignano, Italy; Patrice Laroche, France; Berndt Keller and Anja Kirsch, Germany; Jørgen Steen Madsen, Jesper Due and Søren Kaj Andersen, Denmark; Hiromasa Suzuki, Katsuyuki Kubo and Kazuya Ogura, Japan; Byoung-Hoon Lee, South Korea; Fang Lee Cooke, China; Anil Verma and Shyam Sundar, India). Most of the contributors also made free videos to complement the book; see: study.sagepub.com/node/37463/instructor-access.

We are grateful to Chang Kai, Capital University of Economics and Business, and Fang Lee Cooke, Monash University, for leading the adaptation of the 6th edition into a Chinese version in Mandarin, published by China Labour and Social Security Publishing House (www.class.com.cn). We are also grateful to several conference organizers and participants who allowed us to discuss with them earlier versions of this chapter and who provided helpful comments. We acknowledge that this chapter is an adapted version of our article that was published in the Employee Rights and Responsibilities Journal (ERRJ) Vol. 29(4), 2017 (Wright et al. 2017, http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10672-017-9308-2). ERRJ Vol. 29(3), 2017 included a Symposium (https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10672-017-9301-9) with four review essays that focused on our book. We are obliged to Victor Devinatz (Illinois State University) and the ERRJ for commissioning these essays.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chris F. Wright
    • 1
  • Greg J. Bamber
    • 2
    • 3
  • Nick Wailes
    • 4
  • Russell D. Lansbury
    • 1
  1. 1.The University of Sydney Business SchoolSydneyAustralia
  2. 2.Department of Management, Monash Business SchoolMonash UniversityMelbourneAustralia
  3. 3.Visiting ProfessorHertfordshire University and Newcastle UniversityNewcastle upon TyneUK
  4. 4.UNSW Business SchoolSydneyAustralia

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