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Labour in GVCs: An Analytical Framework

  • Dev Nathan
Chapter

Abstract

The paper deals with the manner in which global outsourcing interacts with labour conditions to produce employment outcomes. A link is made between the distribution of rents and profits in value chain and the possibilities for labour in different segments of GVCs. The segments themselves are differentiated by the knowledge level of the tasks sourced in that segment. There is thus a connection between knowledge levels of GVC segments and labour conditions. This connection, however, can also be affected by the strategies adopted by both firms and labour.

Keywords

Outsourcing Rents Profits Employment conditions GVCs 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dev Nathan
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute for Human DevelopmentNew DelhiIndia
  2. 2.Duke UniversityDurhamUSA

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