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Reacting to the Future: The University Student as Homo Promptus

  • Rosalyn BlackEmail author
  • Lucas Walsh
Chapter
Part of the Perspectives on Children and Young People book series (PCYP, volume 9)

Abstract

As we have shown already, young people face a working world characterised by uncertainty and change. Global competition, labour market flux, the massification of higher education and the reduction of work opportunities due to technological developments are just a few factors contributing both directly and indirectly to this uncertainty and change. Within this context, higher education is increasingly framed by individualised economic goals as a long-term investment in the self.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of EducationDeakin UniversityBurwoodAustralia
  2. 2.Faculty of EducationMonash UniversityClaytonAustralia

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