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The Influence of Rubber Crumbs on the Energy Absorbing Property of Waste Mixtures

  • Yujie Qi
  • Buddhima IndraratnaEmail author
  • Ana Heitor
  • Jayan S. Vinod
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Civil Engineering book series (LNCE, volume 29)

Abstract

The practical application of waste materials such as steel furnace slag (SFS) and coal wash (CW) is becoming more prevalent in civil engineering. While the addition of rubber crumbs (RC) derived from waste tyres can influence the geotechnical properties of the mixtures of SFS and CW significantly, especially the energy absorbing property. In this paper, the energy absorbing property of the SFS + CW + RC mixtures under static loading has been evaluated by the strain energy density. As expected, the energy absorbing capacity of the waste mixture increases with the addition of RC. To further illustrate the influence of rubber crumbs on the energy absorbing property of the waste mixtures, particle degradation has also be examined after finishing the triaxial tests. It has been found that the addition of RC can significantly reduce the particle breakage of the waste mixtures. Therefore, with high energy absorbing property, the SFS + CW + RC mixtures can be further extended to dynamic loading projects, such as railway capping layer.

Keywords

Waste mixtures Rubber crumbs Energy absorbing property Strain energy density 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The first author would like to acknowledge the financial assistance provided by the China Scholarship Council, Australian Research Council Discovery Project (ARC-DP), and the Australian Research Council funded Industrial Transformation Training Centre for Advancement of Rail Infrastructure (ITTC-Rail). The assistance provided by industry (ASMS and South 32) in relation to the procurement of material used in this study is gratefully acknowledged. The assistance in the laboratory from Mr. Richard Berndt and the occasional technical feedback from A/Prof. Cholachat Rujikiatkamjorn are appreciated.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yujie Qi
    • 1
  • Buddhima Indraratna
    • 2
    Email author
  • Ana Heitor
    • 3
  • Jayan S. Vinod
    • 3
  1. 1.School of Civil, Mining and Environmental Engineering, Centre for Geomechanics and Railway Engineering, Australian Research Council Training Centre for Advanced Technologies in Rail Track InfrastructureUniversity of WollongongWollongongAustralia
  2. 2.Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Information Sciences, Centre for Geomechanics and Railway Engineering, Australian Research Council Training Centre for Advanced Technologies in Rail Track InfrastructureUniversity of WollongongWollongongAustralia
  3. 3.Faculty of Engineering and Information Sciences, Centre for Geomechanics and Railway Engineering, Australian Research Council Training Centre for Advanced Technologies in Rail Track InfrastructureUniversity of WollongongWollongongAustralia

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