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Moving Toward Content-Integrated English Literacy Instruction in Taiwan: Perspectives from Stakeholders

  • Chiou-lan Chern
  • Jean E. CurranEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

New curriculum guidelines in Taiwan emphasize overall competency and integration of subjects. Prioritizing subject integration shows that English will now be viewed as a language for learning and communication. This chapter explains how some stakeholders are working toward planning subject-integrated English classes. The first example highlights how one elementary school administrator plans to adopt an interdisciplinary approach to English literacy instruction. The second example describes how English teachers introduced science-related vocabulary and concepts to elementary school students attending a science camp. Perceptions of English teachers and science teachers who were present at the camp are discussed. Policy changes can cause anxiety; however, this chapter shows how some stakeholders in Taiwan view the new English curriculum with a focus on content integration as an opportunity.

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors would like to express their gratitude to the participants. This research would not have been possible without their assistance.

This chapter is an extension of previous research funded by the Ministry of Science and Technology, Taiwan, under grant number MOST 103-2410-H-003-102-MY3.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.National Taiwan Normal UniversityTaipeiTaiwan

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