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Teaching AIDS pp 223-229 | Cite as

Conclusion: Towards a Critical Medical Humanities

  • Dilip K. Das
Chapter

Abstract

The social reality of disease is the outcome of a complex of diverse understandings, such as the perceptions of doctors and patients, public health policies and practices, media accounts, narratives, and legal statutes and court decisions. The study of AIDS pedagogy warrants, therefore, an approach that brings out the multiple sociocultural, political, biomedical and juridical contexts within which the epidemic is framed. To be effective, pedagogies must critically engage with these contexts, which require an interdisciplinary approach that a critical medical humanities can provide.

Keywords

Interdisciplinarity Epistemological critique Critical medical humanities 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dilip K. Das
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Cultural StudiesEnglish and Foreign Languages UniversityHyderabadIndia

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