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Improving Inclusion and Access for People with Disability in the Causasus: The Case of Azerbaijan

  • Mike Titterton
  • Helen Smart
Chapter

Abstract

The challenges and prospects for transforming services and support, along with inclusion in educational and employment settings, for people with disability in a transitional context, such as that offered by Azerbaijan, are examined in this chapter.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mike Titterton
    • 1
  • Helen Smart
    • 2
  1. 1.Health & Life for EveryoneUniversity of EdinburghEdinburghUK
  2. 2.Health & Life for EveryoneEdinburghUK

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