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Research Kaleidoscope

  • Carmel Diezmann
  • Susan Grieshaber
Chapter

Abstract

In the previous chapter, the research history, context, and design were explained. In this chapter, specific theorists and concepts are discussed along with a rationale to indicate why we have selected these theorists and ideas and how they have been used in conjunction with the data. To portray the complexities of the academic and social lives of NWPs, we attempt to produce knowledge differently by thinking with particular theorists and concepts (Jackson AY, Mazzei LA, Thinking with theory in qualitative research: viewing data across multiple perspectives. Routledge, London, 2012). Selected conceptual tools from theorists Judith Butler, Jacques Derrida, Michêl Foucault, and Gayatri Spivak are used to “plug into data” (Jackson AY, Mazzei LA, Thinking with theory in qualitative research: viewing data across multiple perspectives. Routledge, London, 2012) at opportune moments to help think outside accepted understandings that have defined and limited the ways in which women engage in the academy. The ideas of work-family border theory (Clark SC: Human Relat 53(6):747–770. https://doi.org/10.1177/0018726700536001, 2000) are also used to investigate how women’s career profiles are influenced by work and family and the intersections between these domains.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carmel Diezmann
    • 1
  • Susan Grieshaber
    • 2
  1. 1.Queensland University of TechnologyKelvin GroveAustralia
  2. 2.La Trobe UniversityBundooraAustralia

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