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Preparation and Study of HA-CS-Mineralized Collagen Gel

  • Miaomiao Hu
  • Kun HuEmail author
  • Yuzhu Cui
  • Jia Yan
  • Guijuan Yang
  • Lin Zhu
  • Min Yan
  • Yen Wei
  • Luhai Li
  • Fan Zhang
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Electrical Engineering book series (LNEE, volume 543)

Abstract

A hydrogel is a novel high molecular polymer that forms a three-dimensional network structure by polymer chemical or physical cross-linking. In this experimental study, a chitosan-hyaluronic acid gel was used as a carrier, and nano-hydroxyapatite/collagen was composited to prepare a gel-based composite for 3D bio-printing. The properties of the composite gel were analyzed by in vitro gel test, rheological analysis, infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The results showed that the chitosan-hyaluronic acid gel with different mineralized collagen concentrations could be gelled rapidly at 37 °C for 5 min. Rheology experiments show that CS-HA mineralized collagen has shear thinning characteristics suitable for 3D bio-printing. The hydrogel was observed to have a cross-linked morphology by scanning electron microscopy, and the porous structure was good. Has a high biomedical re-research value and use value.

Keywords

Chitosan Hyaluronic acid Rheology Hydrogel 3D bioprinting 

Notes

Acknowledgements

Financial support from the Science and Technology Major Project Foundation of Fujian Province (No. 2015YZ0003), Special project of the education committee—practical training plan Study on a novel temperature-sensitive hyaluronic acid/mineralized collagen composite gel material(Grant No. 03150118005/002/011), Research Project of 3D Printing Mineralized Collagen-based Child Mandible (Grant No. 04190118002/050), Undergraduate Research Training Program—A Preparation for 3D Bioprinting Composite Gel Materials (Grant No. 22150118022/083).

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Miaomiao Hu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Kun Hu
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    Email author
  • Yuzhu Cui
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jia Yan
    • 1
    • 2
  • Guijuan Yang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Lin Zhu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Min Yan
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yen Wei
    • 4
  • Luhai Li
    • 1
    • 2
  • Fan Zhang
    • 5
  1. 1.Institute of Printing and Packaging Engineering, Beijing Institute of Graphic CommunicationBeijingChina
  2. 2.Beijing Engineering Research Center of Printed ElectronicsBeijingChina
  3. 3.College of Biological Science and Engineering, Fuzhou UniversityFujianChina
  4. 4.Department of Chemistry and Tsinghua Center for Frontier Polymer ResearchTsinghua UniversityBeijingChina
  5. 5.The First Hospital of Fuzhou Medical AssociationFujianChina

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