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The Emergence of Radio Astronomy in Asia: Opening a New Window on the Universe

  • Wayne OrchistonEmail author
  • Govind Swarup
Conference paper
Part of the Astrophysics and Space Science Proceedings book series (ASSSP, volume 54)

Abstract

Some countries in the greater Asian area, namely Australia, China, India, Japan and New Zealand, played important roles in the early development of radio astronomy from the 1940s through into the 1960s. In this paper—which is based on the Public Lecture that we presented in Pune during the ICOA-9 conference—we trace these early developments. We then finish this review paper by briefly surveying the exciting new radio astronomical developments that are currently occurring throughout the greater Asian region.

Notes

Acknowledgements

We are grateful to the following for supplying images used in this paper: Arizona State University and NASA/ESA; Auckland University of Technology; Beijing Astronomical Observatory; CSIRO Astronomy and Space Sciences (Sydney); Mary Harris (England); Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, and NOAO/AURA/NSF; Dr. T. Krishnan; Dr. T.K. Menon; National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (Tokyo); National Astronomical Research Institute of Thailand (Chiang Mai); National Physical Laboratory (New Delhi); National Radio Astronomy Observatory (USA); Dr. Koichi Shimoda (Japan); Stanford University News Service; the Tanaka Family (Japan); and Tata Institute of Fundamental Research Archives (Mumbai).

Finally, we wish to thank Mayank Vahia for organising an excellent conference, and for encouraging us to present the ICOA-9 Public Lecture when the original speaker, Professor Clive Ruggles, had to withdraw at the last minute.

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Copyright information

© Hindustan Book Agency 2018 and Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.National Astronomical Research Institute of ThailandChiang MaiThailand
  2. 2.Centre for AstrophysicsUniversity of Southern QueenslandToowoombaAustralia
  3. 3.National Centre for Radio AstrophysicsPuneIndia

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