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Functions of MAPK Signaling Pathways in the Regulation of Toxicity of Environmental Toxicants or Stresses

  • Dayong Wang
Chapter

Abstract

In nematodes, there are three important mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signals (p38 MAPK, JNK MAPK, and ERK MAPK). It is well known for the crucial role of these three MAPK signaling pathways for organisms in response to environmental stresses by transducing the extracellular cues into the cells. In this chapter, we introduced and discussed the involvement and the contribution, as well as the underlying molecular mechanisms for the response, of these three important MAPK signaling pathways in the regulation of toxicity of environmental toxicants or stresses in nematodes.

Keywords

MAPK signaling pathway Molecular regulation Environmental exposure Caenorhabditis elegans 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dayong Wang
    • 1
  1. 1.School of MedicineSoutheast UniversityNanjingChina

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