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Overview of Singapore’s Education System and Milestones in the Development of the System and School Mathematics Curriculum

  • Berinderjeet KaurEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Mathematics Education – An Asian Perspective book series (MATHEDUCASPER)

Abstract

The first part of the chapter acquaints the reader with Singapore’s education system, mainly the goals of education, primary school, secondary school and post-secondary schools/institutions. The courses of study at appropriate years of schooling and the relationships between the corresponding mathematics syllabuses in the courses of study are presented. It also illuminates the possible lateral transfers between courses of study at the secondary school and various pathways to post-secondary education and institutes of higher learning. The second part of the chapter traces chronologically the milestones of the education system for the last six decades, which fall into four well-marked phases in the development of the system. The phases are (i) survival-driven phase (1959–1978), (ii) efficiency-driven phase (1979–1996), (iii) ability-based, aspiration-driven phase (1997–2011), and (iv) values-based, student-centric phase (2012–present). Alongside these developmental phases, the milestones in the development of the school mathematics curriculum are also elaborated.

Keywords

School mathematics curriculum Singapore’s education system Survival-driven phase Efficiency-driven phase Ability-based aspiration-driven phase Values-based student-centric phase Development milestones 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.National Institute of Education SingaporeSingaporeSingapore

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