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Defining Language Ideology and Language Order

  • Minglang ZhouEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter reviews previous studies on the relationship between language/linguistics and ideology from the approaches of anthropological linguistics, cognitive linguistics and history of linguistics and the sociology of language. It makes a distinction between language ideology and linguistic ideology, the former of which operates consciously at the macro-level while the latter of which functions subconsciously at the micro-level. Recognizing it as a topic understudied, this chapter defines language order as a hierarchy of institutionalized relationship among languages, where languages are ordered according to their allocated access to resources. Following the Marxist tradition, the chapter treats language ideology as the superstructure and language order as the base with a dialectical relationship between the two. These concepts serve as the framework for the analysis of language ideology and order in rising China.

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of Maryland College ParkCollege ParkUSA

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