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Australia Tries to Forget Africa

  • Nikola Pijović
Chapter
Part of the Africa's Global Engagement: Perspectives from Emerging Countries book series (AGEG)

Abstract

Pijovic examines Australia’s ‘episodic’ engagement with Africa during the reign of Prime Minister John Howard’s conservative government (1996–2007), arguing that Australia during this time for the most part tried to forget about Africa. Pijovic also outlines the structural issues—termed the ‘Decline of Africa’—which underpinned engagement with Africa in the 1990s, before arguing that it was the agency of the Howard government that ultimately determined Australia’s disengagement from the continent. The most high-profile episode of Australia’s engagement with Africa during this time revolved around Prime Minister Howard’s bruising encounter with African leaders during the 2002/03 Commonwealth suspension of Zimbabwe, and particularly his falling out with South Africa’s President Thabo Mbeki.

Keywords

John Howard Structure and Agency ‘Decline of Africa’ Commonwealth Zimbabwe 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nikola Pijović
    • 1
  1. 1.Africa Research and Engagement CentreUniversity of Western AustraliaPerthAustralia

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