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Leadership Ideology and Socioeconomic Inequality: The Case of Israeli Kibbutzim

  • Uriel LeviatanEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

In this chapter, the author seeks to answer the question, “Why do some affluent societies adopt socioeconomic inequality and some do not?” and suggests governmental/leadership ideology as the major factor. This chapter presents secondary analysis of data from research conducted on members (about 700) from 32 kibbutzim, both “traditional” and “differential”. Transformed kibbutzim are called “differential” and the ones which stay communal – “traditional”.

Keywords

Socioeconomic inequality Leadership ideology Comprehensive mutual responsibility Differential Kibbutzim Traditional kibbutzim 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Sociology and the Institute for the Research of the KibbutzUniversity of HaifaHaifaIsrael

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