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Biologics and Inflammatory Bowel Disease

  • V. Pratap Mouli
  • Vineet Ahuja
Chapter
Part of the GI Surgery Annual book series (GISA, volume 25)

Abstract

Inflammatory bowel disease is an immune-mediated disorder involving a complex interplay of host genetics and environmental factors. With the unraveling of various immune mechanisms involved in the disease pathogenesis, various biologic drugs targeting the mediators in the inflammatory pathways have become an important part of the therapeutics of inflammatory bowel disease. The various biologics available, indications and efficacy of biologics in the management of inflammatory bowel diseases, the risks involved in their usage, and practical aspects in various clinical settings are discussed in the current review.

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Copyright information

© Indian Association of Surgical Gastroenterology 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. Pratap Mouli
    • 1
  • Vineet Ahuja
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of GastroenterologyAll India Institute of Medical SciencesNew DelhiIndia

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