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State Restructuring and the Internationalization of Capital in Southeast Asia

  • Faris Al-Fadhat
Chapter
Part of the Critical Studies of the Asia-Pacific book series (CSAP)

Abstract

This chapter examines the state restructuring of the ASEAN member countries and how it is crucially linked to the emergence of internationally oriented fractions of capital and the process of international expansion that follows. It will look at the case study of Singapore, Malaysia, and Thailand. The discussion of these countries provides a broader context of the state restructuring and the internationalization of capital across the Southeast Asian region, before looking into a close study of Indonesia which will be explained in two separate chapters. This chapter explains the way in which the internationalization of capital is linked to the process of state restructuring. With the transformation of new internationally oriented fractions of capital, the state helps reproduce the social relationships that underpin capitalist expansion beyond territorial frontiers.

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Authors and Affiliations

  • Faris Al-Fadhat
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of International RelationsUniversitas Muhammadiyah YogyakartaBantulIndonesia

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