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Transport Policies and Planning in Surabaya

  • Suryani Eka Wijaya
  • Muhammad Imran
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter discusses the policy tensions that occurred at multiple levels in the planned development of a BRT project in Surabaya. International development organisations advocated the BRT project as a solution to urban transport problems and as part of Indonesia’s global climate change mitigation strategy. The Surabayan government, with strong support from various international development agencies, international NGOs and central government ministries, developed technical knowledge of transport issues and of BRT as a solution for the city. However, this top-down and technocratic approach to dealing with urban transport problems failed when the city’s political leadership changed, eventually leading to rejection of the BRT project and its replacement with a monorail project. This situation was triggered by a lack of communication and a failure to build partnerships with local actors. The complexities of BRT decision-making in Surabaya show that the socio-political power of local politicians, along with the support of discursive storylines, can challenge the institutional-financial power of central government and international development agencies.

Keywords

BRT in Surabaya City Mayor Media Local actors Storylines 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Suryani Eka Wijaya
    • 1
  • Muhammad Imran
    • 2
  1. 1.BAPPEDA of NTB ProvinceMataramIndonesia
  2. 2.Massey UniversityPalmerston NorthNew Zealand

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