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Transport Planning and Policies in Indonesia

  • Suryani Eka Wijaya
  • Muhammad Imran
Chapter

Abstract

The development of transport policies in Indonesia involves complex political-institutional processes. Many actors participate in the interdependent web of central, provincial and local government. International development agencies and international NGOs increase that complexity when they set their own policy directions as part of their technical and funding assistance. Several strategies to mitigate or to adapt to climate change have influenced national climate change policy in Indonesia since 2000, under which the development of a BRT system emerged as a popular solution for urban transport problems. Associated policies in transport, energy, and spatial and development planning, and economic growth, strengthened the political appeal of BRT development projects. This chapter presents insights into transport-related decision-making in Indonesia, especially the role and responsibilities of different government organisations and the role of international organisations in preparing transport, environment and climate change, spatial planning, energy and economic policies and programmes that have proposed BRT for Indonesian cities.

Keywords

Transport decision-making Key actors in policy formulation BRT in transport Environment and climate change Spatial planning Energy Economic policies 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Suryani Eka Wijaya
    • 1
  • Muhammad Imran
    • 2
  1. 1.BAPPEDA of NTB ProvinceMataramIndonesia
  2. 2.Massey UniversityPalmerston NorthNew Zealand

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