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Guru Agency: Combining Charisma, Teachings, and Proliferation

  • Samta P. Pandya
Chapter

Abstract

The idea of a charismatic guru is the Archimedean standpoint of the HIFMs. Max Weber’s classic stance on charisma is that of a specific revolutionary force in history, dependent upon social enchantment. Recognition of the power of charisma is the central aspect in the social and psychological dynamics of charismatic authority.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Samta P. Pandya
    • 1
  1. 1.Tata Institute of Social SciencesMumbaiIndia

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