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Northern Mallee Declared Species Group—Esperance, Western Australia

  • Tanya M. HowardEmail author
  • Theodore R. Alter
  • Paloma Z. Frumento
  • Lyndal J. Thompson
Chapter

Abstract

The Northern Mallee Declared Species Group (NMDSG) case documents challenges faced by a single-species wild dog action group in a changing policy context. A looming state government reform to the funding and management regime is seen to threaten the group’s long-running and well-tested model of community-led action.

Initially formed to protect sheep farming interests, the group has been successful in adapting their message to stay focused on wild dog control, while accessing support from other agricultural industries. A strong and highly visible Chairperson leads with passion and conviction. Members are willing to take action in support of the leader, utilising the media contacts and industry networks to implement a strategy of community-led action that is strongly tied to political advocacy.

The Chairperson remains committed to a long running campaign to extend the wild dog fence. This tenacity inspires loyalty from the group members, and sometimes begrudging admiration from government and industry. Strong leadership, a distinct feature of this case, can be difficult to replace and this raises questions about the long-term sustainability of the group.

In the NMDSG case, the increased responsibilities and workloads that come with formalised group structures are clearly illustrated, raising important questions about how to strike the best balance between community-led action and coordination support.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tanya M. Howard
    • 1
    Email author
  • Theodore R. Alter
    • 2
  • Paloma Z. Frumento
    • 2
  • Lyndal J. Thompson
    • 3
  1. 1.Australian Centre for Agriculture and LawUniversity of New EnglandArmidaleAustralia
  2. 2.Center for Economic and Community DevelopmentPennsylvania State UniversityUniversity ParkUSA
  3. 3.Department of Education and TrainingUniversity of New EnglandCanberraAustralia

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