Advertisement

Lesson Study

  • Yasuhiko FujieEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Education in the Asia-Pacific Region: Issues, Concerns and Prospects book series (EDAP, volume 47)

Abstract

Lesson Study, a form of research on teaching by teachers, creates learning opportunities for teachers. Lesson Study is a collaborative process in which teachers observe, analyze, and evaluate each other’s actual classroom lessons mainly with the objective of improving their lessons. In a typical flow of Lesson Study, a classroom lesson is observed by other teachers, and this is followed by a conference in which the observers present their analyses and interpretations of lesson elements such as the teacher’s and students’ specific actions during the lesson, lesson content and teaching materials, learning style, and educational goals. The teacher who administered the lesson reflects on the lesson, his or her professional competencies, and other relevant matters. One cycle of Lesson Study is completed when both the observed and observer teachers apply findings from the conference to designing their respective future lessons. This indicates that Lesson Study serves as a learning opportunity for teachers, as it is said that teachers learn by example (Shulman 2004). Lesson Study in Japan is primarily characterized by its school-based organization. Defining Lesson Study as an organizational learning opportunity, we present in this chapter an overview of Lesson Study as practiced in Japan and explain its actual situation through the example of an elementary school.

References

  1. Kage, M. 2008. “Jugyo zukuri niokeru ‘shikake’” [Devices for lesson design]. In K. Akita, & C. Lewis (Eds.), Jugyo no kenkyu kyoshi no gakushu: Lesson study eno izanai [Study of lessons teacher’s learning: An invitation to lesson study] (pp. 152–168). Tokyo: Akashi Shoten.Google Scholar
  2. National Institute for Educational Policy Research, The (NIER). (2011). Kyoin no shitsu no kojo nikansuru chosa kenkyu houkokusho [Report of the survey on the qualitative improvement of school teachers].Google Scholar
  3. Sakamoto, A., & Akita, K. (2008). “Jugyo kenkyu kyogikai deno kyoshi no gakushu: Shogakko kyoshi no shiko katei no bunseki” [Teachers’ learning in lesson study conference: Analysis of elementary school teachers’ thought process]. In K. Akita, & C. Lewis (Eds.), Jugyo no kenkyu kyoshi no gakushu: Lesson study eno izanai [Study of lessons teacher’s learning: An invitation to lesson study] (pp. 98–113). Tokyo: Akashi Shoten.Google Scholar
  4. Sato, M. 2015. Senmonka toshite kyoshi o sodateru: kyoshi kyoiku kaikaku no grand design [Training teachers as professionals: A grand design for teacher training reform]. Tokyo: Iwanami Shoten.Google Scholar
  5. Shulman, L. (2004). The wisdom of practice: Essays on teaching, learning, and learning to teach. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.Google Scholar
  6. Shulman, L., & Shulman, J. H. (2004). How and what teachers learn: A shifting perspective. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 36(2), 257–271.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Wolf, J., & Akita, K. (2008). “Lesson Study no kokusai doko to jugyo kenkyu eno toi: Nippon, America, Hong Kong ni okeru Lesson Study no hikaku kenkyu” [International trends of lesson study and questions about lesson study: a comparative study of lesson study in Japan, America, and Hong Kong]. In K. Akita and C. Lewis (Eds.), Jugyo no kenkyu kyoshi no gakushu: Lesson study eno izanai [Study of lessons teacher’s learning: An invitation to lesson study] (pp. 24–42). Tokyo: Akashi Shoten.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Graduate School of EducationThe University of TokyoTokyoJapan

Personalised recommendations