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‘Between States and Insurgents’: The ICRC in Internal Armed Conflicts

  • Rajeesh Kumar
Chapter

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is twofold. First, to appraise the significant developments in the field of international humanitarian law relating to situations of internal armed conflicts. Second, to assess the role of the ICRC in internal armed conflicts. It discusses the contributions of the ICRC to the advancement of international humanitarian law related to the internal armed conflict and its massive relief operations in the conflict zones. In its early years, the ICRC aimed to engage only in conflicts between states, particularly in large-scale European wars. However, later the organization began to focus on intra-state armed conflicts as well. The focus of the chapter is the challenges faced by the ICRC while working between states and insurgents and its efforts to expand the scope of international humanitarian norms and standards. Though the states persistently resisted the development of rules of internal armed conflicts by arguing that such rules would adversely affect their sovereignty, the ICRC consistently pursued its endeavours as a norm entrepreneur.

Keywords

Internal armed conflicts ICRC International Humanitarian Law Diplomatic Conferences Common Article 3 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rajeesh Kumar
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Defence Studies and AnalysesNew DelhiIndia

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