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Energy Performance in Buildings: Standards and Codes

  • Pranab Kumar Nag
Chapter
Part of the Design Science and Innovation book series (DSI)

Abstract

The global energy needs are ever expanding, and the building stock in the world takes a 40% share of energy consumption. The energy use by the non-residential buildings is averaged to about 150 kWh/m2, and therefore, any endeavour towards energy-efficient buildings is beneficial to the total energy saving and mitigating climate impacts. This chapter covers national-level regulatory provisions and energy-efficient building codes and programmes, including European Union energy performance of buildings directives, ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1:2016 and country-specific (China, India, Brazil, South Africa) energy conservation codes. The discussion also includes to EU directives on energy-efficient product development, ENERGY STAR program in establishing energy efficiency criteria of products, electrical appliances, lighting types, and the Top Runner program of Japan to improve the energy performance of electrical products. A checklist is included for measuring state energy code compliance concerning building energy consumption. ISO EN 13790:2008 is one of the primary standards applicable to buildings at the design stage and to existing buildings. The chapter includes the specified stepwise calculation procedures for building energy use for space heating and cooling.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pranab Kumar Nag
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Environment and Disaster ManagementRamakrishna Mission Vivekananda UniversityKolkataIndia

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