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The Self Between Race and Language: Two Hong Kong Bilingual/Bicultural Plays

  • Kwok-kan Tam
Chapter

Abstract

Race is a concept that refers to a community in which members consider themselves to be alike and belong to the same community. This is a shared identity, which has properties that may be defined by physical/biological or cultural attributes. However, as Benedict Anderson has argued, this community is an imagined one because the members do not know most of the other members (Anderson 1995, 6–7). In other words, racial identity is based on a commonly-shared imaginary of commonly-shared attributes.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kwok-kan Tam
    • 1
  1. 1.The Hang Seng University of Hong KongShatinHong Kong

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